Workplace theft is an issue that often crops up in the United States. You have minor cases, such as fast-food workers stealing meals that go over the amount they’re allotted, and you have major cases, such as accountants who fake the books and steal millions of dollars. 

While it may seem straightforward to assume that workplace theft is illegal, it’s actually very easy for people to rationalize it. Some of the reasons they may cite include:

  • They saw someone at a higher level, such as a manager, stealing from the company.
  • They do not feel that they get enough in salary or hourly wages.
  • They were supposed to get paid for overtime, and they never got the extra money.
  • Their boss is not kind to them and never supports them or tells them that they’re doing well on the job.
  • They sacrifice a lot for the company, agreeing to work on the weekends or take on extra shifts.
  • The lion’s share of the profits go to those at the top, not the employees, and they think it’s unfair.
  • No one cares about the theft, and it feels like everyone is doing it.
  • They have not been given a raise, or they have been denied when they asked for one.

As you can see, most of these reasons have a lot to do with the fact that many employees feel used or abused by the corporate system. They often feel like their actions are justified, but that type of theft still breaks the law.

Mistakes do happen. People sometimes steal from an employer out of desperation or due to complex personal problems. Those facing criminal charges must know what legal options they have for a defense. An experienced attorney can help.